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macosoft
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OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Wed Jul 21, 2010 1:47 pm

Hello forum,
I have a small wireless network with a /24 public IP's.
What routing protocol shoul I use: OSPF or BGP?

P.S.: The network will have a single RB1100 router, after that just switches and clients connected wireless with public IP's.
 
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Wed Jul 21, 2010 2:40 pm

As this is your local network, then OSPF or other IGP.
 
blake
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Wed Jul 21, 2010 2:42 pm

Do you plan on subnetting that /24 further?

If the RB1100 is going to be your sole router, and the wireless APs will run in bridge mode then there is no reason to use a routing protocol. Use Spanning Tree Protocol to ensure a loop free topology at Layer 2.

Deploy OSPF when you add more routers in the future.
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macosoft
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Thu Jul 22, 2010 9:29 am

I have internet connection to one IP: 86.127.70.132, then I have my own 256 public IP's 80.97.140.0/24.
My RB1100 should have on first ethernet port the connection to the internet (86.127.70.132) and on the other ports should have 80.97.140.1 to be a gateway for my network. All the AP's will be in bridge mode and have public IP's (and clients too) like 80.97.140.18, 80.97.140.19... and so on.

What routing protocol shoul I use in this case?
 
blake
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Thu Jul 22, 2010 10:48 am

Spanning Tree Protocol.

The topology you're describing sounds like it'll be strictly layer 2. You don't need a routing protocol until you're actually routing, which is layer 3.
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:57 pm

You have to instruct your uplink ISP to route the 80.97.140.0/24 IP range to you on your assigned 86.127.70.132 IP
 
blake
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:33 pm

You have to instruct your uplink ISP to route the 80.97.140.0/24 IP range to you on your assigned 86.127.70.132 IP
Sounds like they're already doing that. His questions revolve around how to best use that IP space internally with his various bridges and clients. Since its all bridged, there is no need for a routing protocol.
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macosoft
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Sat Jul 24, 2010 11:58 am

Yes blake, they already doing that.
So, I need to set 86.127.70.132 on ethernet 1 and 80.97.140.1 on ethernet 2 - 13.
Do I need to bridge all the ports toghether, or manually assign 80.97.140.1 to each port?
 
danielillu
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Re: OSPF or BGP for wireless network?

Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:21 am

Hi there,

If I understand what you are trying to do, I'll tell what I'd do.

If I'm correct, ports 1-5 and 6-10 can be connected as a switch.

What I'd do is:
- set up ether1 the master port for ether2-5.
- set up ether6 the master port for ether7-10.

Now, you will only "see" traffic counting through ethernets 1 and 6 because they are the only ports connected "directly" to RouterOS, but all ports are working, don't worry. Using the switch features you will offload CPU the task of managing a huge 10-port bridge.

- create a bridge and add ether1, and ether6 to it. Set up RTSP to avoid Layer2 loops.

- Add your "internal" IP (...140.1) to the bridge1 (or ether1 or ether6).

- Add your "external" IP (....70.132) to ether11, 12 or 13.

Now you are done.

Connect the rest of your equipment to ether1-10 taking careful account of what IPs you are assigning to them (if you assign them statically). The default gateway for the rest of the equipment is ...140.1


But, I'd prefer to split the full range in two /25 (or in four /26) ranges and assign each half to a different sectors of the network. Splitting in two /25 is easy to understand: you can assign each half to each switch and assign a gateway IP to each master port.

But don't alter your plans if you are not sure about how to mess with subnetworks. You will learn about it (the hard or soft way, it depends on the problems you find).


There are too many variants to network segmentation to explain them here but knowing the basics, knowing your plans and thinking in future expansions you will find a good solution that works for your network and for you.


Good luck with your network.


PS: You are a lucky for owning a RB1100; they are hard to find.

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