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pannivas
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ptp 2 buildings @3km distance and 40mbps

Tue Nov 07, 2006 2:40 pm

Hello,

I am new here and I was wondering if its possible to achieve the following with the following equipment.

The objective is to establish a point to point connection between 2 buildings. The distances are 3km and there is Line of Sight. We wish to achieve a maximum of half duplex 40mbps connection if possible.

Will the Mikrotik ready packages for Point-to-point links do the job?
1) First Building will have the (RIC/522E) 5.1-5.8Ghz Integrated Router Antenna
http://www.mikrotik.com/systems.php#RIC_522E

2) The second building will have the (RB/RPO) MikroTik 5GHz OUTDOOR Client Package
http://www.mikrotik.com/systems.php#RB_RPO

Will the above equipment do the job or do we need to setup RouterOS on a PC based system? We do have 2 spare 2.4GHz PCs with 256mb of ram so that wouldn’t be much of a problem of setting up PCs with RouterOS on a IDE Flash. But my only concern about setting up a pc will be the difficulty to put it outdoors, and if indoors then it means longer antenna cables.

Any help/recommendations are greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 
muehlbauer
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Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:37 am

l40Mbit link

Wed Nov 08, 2006 9:59 am

Shouldn't be a problem especially given your short distance.
Run NStream protocol and use Turbo mode (108Mbs)
That should help optimize packets and keep your high speed link going.
My only suggestion would be to run 2 foot or 3 foot dish antennas on either side so you can burn through any possible future channel problems as the spectrum gets crowded.
I installed this for a customer, only difference was a full duplex wireless link.
Works very well. I can't remember the metrics off hand but you should be fine with what you are trying to accomplish.
 
pannivas
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Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:20 am

Thanks for your reply muehlbauer.

The thing is that on one side installing a 2 or 3 foot dish is hard that’s why I choose the flat panel antenna. I don’t think it will be a problem in the future as tall buildings or trees or any other obstacles don’t just pop out in my city.

Assuming that we have a clear LOS and use the above kits what do you think will be the max bandwidth thought output that can be achieved? It doesn’t have to be precise just an approximation will fine.

Thanks again.
 
muehlbauer
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Speed

Wed Nov 08, 2006 11:06 am

Based on what other stats people have posted I would guess you would be looking at about 42-45MBit. Your max speed will definitely be a function of your CPU on this setup. The more horse power you throw at this the better.
One setup someone posted here shoots 120 kilometers with 30Mbit, so if you don't get the speed your after you may need to change out the routers with your Pentium boxes. If that would be the case, just put two 24 dB antennas at each other with the long cable run of LMR-400 or 600. The signal loss of the cabling will be made up in the antenna gain.

I am not a big fan of flat panel antennas. It's been my experience they just don't perform as good. Dishes have the best front to back ratio, yet a good compromise in hard to install places is a yagi as they are very discriminating regarding other 5GHz noise.

Remember that on a half duplex link you will see a good spread in speed difference between TCP and UDP packets as the later don't send error control back to the originator and on half duplex that means waiting while the other side sends.
 
pannivas
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Wed Nov 08, 2006 11:20 am

Thanks again this is really is helpful.

Can you provide me with some suggestions and equipment about the following?

1) Good 5GHz yagi antennas?
2) What Wireless cards should I use with my Pentium Pcs?
3) In the future if I want to make another ptp from either of the 2 sides then i would just need to put another antenna and a wireless card on the pc right?

Thanks again muehlbauer really appreciate all the great help give here.
 
muehlbauer
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antennas and more

Wed Nov 08, 2006 12:11 pm

Actually, I got ahead of myself on the Yagi. That comment is good for 2.4GHz.
On the 5.8GHz links the grid antennas are just as easy to install, have even better wind loading as long as you don't live in an area that ices up real bad.
http://www.pacwireless.com/products/GD58.shtml
I have used the 26dB antenna in many locations and it's very good.
Pacific Wireless sells good equipment at a fair price. Used them for many years.

If you do live in a cold area prone to icing stay away from the grid antennas. They turn into a huge ball of ice and likeley brake off the mount. The backfire antennas in said environment would be best in that area if you can't really install a dish with radom enclosure.
http://www.pacwireless.com/products/ES58-17.shtml

On the pentium PC's I would get a PCI to mini PCI adapter which is the
(IA/MP1R) RouterBOARD 11 MiniPCI Adapter with bracket for RPTNC
and for the radio get the (SR5) Super Range 5 400mW 802.11a 5.8GHz MiniPCI card. Good idea to go with the IDE flash card. This equipment on both sides will work very well. The "can of worms" you are opening, if you go this route, is that you would need to teach yourself how to crimp LMR cable ends and properly weather proof the connectors. Not rocket science but necessary to do absolutely perfect to minimize dB loss.

The answer to your 3rd question is absolutely yes.
On a side note I have been using $10 Realtek ethernet cards for the wired interfaces and they seem to work awesome.
 
pannivas
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Wed Nov 08, 2006 12:42 pm

No snow at all where I live, just some wind and rain that’s all, mainly dry and sunny climate. So the grid antennas seem like a good choice where dish installation is hard.

I now have a full list of what equipment I will need on each side. I will go for the IDE flash SW/FL4 with the (Level 4) license, routerboard 11 and SR5 with U.fl-Nfemale pigtail.

I will probably buy a ready made cable with the Nfemale connectors on them, but can you suggest some good ways to weather proof the connectors properly?

Also can you please explain why use the 26dbi grid antenna instead of the 29dbi grid antenna? Is this because the GD58-26 has a higher front to back ratio?

Thanks again muehlbauer for taking the time to help a newbie here. :D
 
muehlbauer
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Tape and such

Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:41 pm

http://sharperconcepts.zoovy.com/catego ... ofingtape/
This is the type of tape I use although I don't buy it online. A local place has it. It's a kind of tar, putty, plastic that you can wrap around the ends then press and mold out all the possible holes. Make sure to tie down your cabling in such a way that the ends can not move in the wind.

I suggested the 26 dB antenna simply thinking of your distance requirements (which isn't that far). You could go bigger it just starts to get harder to mount. I have two of the 26 dB antennas on a 5.5 mile point to point mounted horizontally and it's rock solid. That link rebroadcasts to feed about 200 customers in a small town with never a worry of link stability or throughput. I am running some Proxim Tsunami gear on it which is good but older so I don't have the higher speeds of the newer technology.

Oh, tuning in your point to point wants to be a two man job if possible. One on the Mikrotik reading off dB and the other up tuning. You want to do this on both sides of course. The beamwidth is very tight on these directionals and it has suprised me sometimes how off I have been when manually sighting in the link.

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